This former thriving community, wishing to have power to control the sale of whiskey in their vicinity, secured an act of the legislature for the incorporation of the little town on December 30, 1851. The town was located in land lot 30 of the 15th district, and the radius of its circular limits was one-half mile with the store of Pitts and Glass as the center of the circle.

The pioneers selected this particular locality on account of the large size of the trees, which indicated to them a great fertility of the soil. The names of the early citizens include many families, which took an important part in the development of the county. Associated with this community are the names of Robert Allen, Jack Bassett, J. T. Boykin, G. W. Birdsong, H. H. Cary, W. P. Edmondson, Jacob Freeman, Wash Formby, Thomas M. Floyd, Henry Goss, Willis Greene, Smith Horsley, Wade Hill, Jack Henderson, B. C. Johnson, James Mallory, Elihu Pitts, Wiley Rowland, E. A. Reid, J. B. Reid, William Strong, William Samples, James Taylor, Jerry Tucker, Charles Vickers, Archie Whatley, Willis Whatley, John Wilkes, Hamp Wisdom, J. T. Whitley, Thomas Winn, James Wilder, L. H. Young, and many others.

The first settler on the west side of the Chattahoochee River was Abram Ingram; Captain Jack Estes was the second, and Nimrod B. Yarbrough was the third. The first white child born on the west side of the river was Frank Johnson.